Artist Statement Round 2

People travel all the time to destinations they have only have seen in photographs.  You look at these photographs wondering what it would be like to be in those shoes, holding that camera and clicking the shutter capturing that breathtaking moment.  Now take that camera you’re holding and shift your view to the first garbage, construction, or homeless person you see.  Find the beauty in the unkempt, get on the subject’s level, and press down on the shutter and that is what I want to convey in my work.

Finding the beauty in everything ugly is every optimists goal, but without a visual, how can you see what they want you to see.  Presenting these picture to the viewers is my way of letting them appreciate what I want them to see instead of the other distracting things that may be around.  Going out and finding these things is my own little adventure with these photographs.  I’ve traveled from the woods to the city, in the gutters, and around a dried up lake no matter the time of day or night.  I find these simple, yet grungy, moments that no one wants to look at and capture it within my viewfinder.  These are the moments that people surpass everyday and ignore, so here they are for you to see.

Digital vs. Print

It’s almost as if you wanted to pay for the pay-per-view when you saw the title of this.  But, the only thing you really have to pay for is the paper and ink to print it on.  You can hear people go back and forth about the good and bad’s of digital and printing photos.  But in the end, it is always based upon opinion and the person who buys the work.  I, myself, lean a little more towards prints than digital but I have nothing against digital.  I just feel as if I appreciate a print more because it went through the time and money of being printed and worthy of the money spent on it.  Don’t get me wrong though, there are photos that should have never touched paper.  For a college student, printing has two faces.  The accomplishment and presentation side which is the side I like to look at.  Photos look better on paper.  It doesn’t depend on the screen that it is being shown on after it has been printed.  But of course, flip it over and there is the suck your bank account dry side.  Very expensive if you actually care about size.  And even if you don’t, there is the ink price.  Digital is easy and efficient, but kind of boring at times.  Either way, photos are photos and no one cares if you complain.

Artist Statement Draft

People travel all the time to destinations they have only have seen in photographs.  You look at these photographs wondering what it would be like to be in those shoes, holding that camera and clicking the shutter capturing that breathtaking moment.  Now take that camera you’re holding and shift your view to the first garbage, construction, or homeless person you see.  Find the beauty in the unkempt, get on the subject’s level, and press down on the shutter and that is what I try to convey in my work. 

Going out and about

I’ve been advised to add more people photos to my “Anti-travel” work.  It is a lot harder than you think in this little crap town of Huntsville, TX.  Taking night shots is another suggestion I got during a critique.  The big factor in both of these of course is the time.  Work and school consume every part of me with an officer position on top of that.  Another is the fact of creating a work that no one else has seen and if you’ve been in Huntsville long enough you know what almost everything looks like.  I know I will overcome these challenges but it all depends on when I can get them done.

Quote Thoughts

I am afraid that there are more people than I can imagine who can go no further than appreciating a picture that is a rectangle with an object in the middle of it, which they can identify. They don’t care what is around the object as long as nothing interferes with the object itself, right in the centre. Even after the lessons of Winogrand and Friedlander, they don’t get it. They respect their work because they are told by respectable institutions that they are important artists, but what they really want to see is a picture with a figure or an object in the middle of it. They want something obvious. The blindness is apparent when someone lets slip the word ‘snapshot’. Ignorance can always be covered by ‘snapshot’. The word has never had any meaning. I am at war with the obvious.

—William Eggleston

Of course he speaks the truth.  We use the word “snapshot” to cover up the crap that day to day people think is photography.  These days, if the picture looks somewhat decent and/or they make the person look “good”, then they are considered a photographer.  Of course, this puts a bad name out for those who consider photography as an art.  And it seems that recently, everyone buys SLR’s so they can brag they have a nice camera which will make them a “photographer.” But after talk to them, you figure out that they keep their camera on “greenbox” (automatic) and have no idea what the other letters on the dial mean.  I guess that is why they came up with pictures as presets.  What kind of crap is that?.  I don’t know why they don’t just buy a point n shoot that has more mega pixels because that is what they look at anyway.  More money for the camera companies I guess.

Andreas Gursky’s Rhein II

First of all… Really???  I see everyone work there ass off to become great photographers and then when a simple picture such as this comes out with a huge success, everything else feels pointless.  Yea, it has lines… so what?.  I feel that someone could have taken that with a point and shoot.  Maybe she did, who knows.  Oh well… good for them.  Give it a couple of years, and if they don’t sell any more, then they will be back to where they started… or worse.  I may not be the artsy person that should be critiquing most gallery photos, but I feel like I have some vision that could do better than that.

Midterm Critique for Contemporary Issues

Concept: Anti- Travel photgraphy

Tomiko Jones Gallery

What really got me during the talk is the amount of time she spent coming up with the whole exhibit.  20 years is a very long time to work on one thing.  I do realize that she was working on it off and on as well as doing other work but it takes a lot of passion to keep going on the same thing for 20 years.  Finding passion in your work and in the things that you do is very important and also can be very challenging.  Of course, once you find it does show up in your work and I can tell that it is in hers.

The piece that really stuck out to me was the triptych of the door on the beach.  The way it was shot really spoke to me and I wanted to leave right there and go out to take photos.  I believe after I am done with the Anti-Travel work I am doing now, I want to try out some photos like that. 

Don’t quit your day job

I read an article for my contemporary issues in photography class.  Pretty much it described all the problems with photographers losing money due to the digital age of photography.  Because taking finding photographs has gotten easier for the world, profits diminish jobs are taken away along with creativity.  Long story short, don’t quit your day job.  Making photography a career has become even more difficult with time so that photographers need another job that will support their lifestyle.  It sucks, but can we do it about it… nothing.  Luckily, my path has brought me into the business world.  Whether I work for magazines or an advertising agency, photography will still be a big part of my life but I won’t have to rely on it for income.  With every day, I do learn about different styles and different people that it interests me how they will live their life through photography.  I guess we’ll see… or not.